Chalk Talk – Episode 36 – The Off-Season – Thinking Big Picture

# 36 -The Off-Season – Thinking Big Picture

Every team looks at ‘winning the off-season’ as a means to their next in-season success. While a lot of teams will be chomping at the bit to get one rep maxes and go as hard as possible, Coach Bres joins the podcast to encourage coaches to think BIG PICTURE this off-season.

Time Stamps: 
Part 1: Max Out or Ease In 
  • Rest, Dont Rush (0:00 – 5:00) 
  • Baseline Numbers – Not One Rep Maxes (5:00 – 9:00)
  • Kids Come and Go – Thats Reality – Plan Accordingly  (9:00 – 13:45) 
  • Adjust and Adapt Training Plans (13:45 –  15:56) 
Part 2: The Off Season Balancing Act
  • Size, Strength, Power, Speed – Trying To Do One At A Time Versus Blending All (15:56 – 20:11)
  • ‘We Were Not (INSERT REACTIONARY ITEM)’ – Don’t Make Off-Season Plan Around The Reactionary (20:11 – 25:00)
  • Culture – Getting Kids To Show Up (25:00 – 29:00)
  • Training Frequency (29:00 – 31:18)
  • Don’t Create Workouts – Create A Larger Plan  (31:19 – 35:38)
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Chalk Talk – Episode 35 – Positivity In PE – feat. Nick Clements

Meet Nick Clements

  • B.S. in Exercise Science from Truman State University
  • M. Ed from Truman State University
  • Currently in 1st year of teaching P.E./Health/Weight Training at Liberty High School (Lake St. Louis, MO.)
  • Liberty High School Varsity Softball Coach (Lake St. Louis, MO.) (1 Year)
  • Liberty High School Varsity Baseball Coach (Lake St. Louis, MO.) (1 Year)
  • MOSHAPE 2019 Middle School P.E. Teacher of the Year
  • Previously taught P.E. at Wentzville Middle School (Wentzville, MO.)  for 5 years

# 35 – Positivity In PE – Feat. Nick Clements

Take on your teaching with energy and positivity! Don’t count down the days until school is over, instead make each and every day count. 

We bring on a Nick Clements, Shape Teacher Of The Year, to talk about how establishing relationships and changing your verbiage can go a long way to a happy and healthy career of teaching. 

Time Stamps: 
Part 1: Power Of Positivity 
  • Becoming A Teacher – Meet Nick Clements (00:00 – 5:13) 
  • From Energy Stems Relationship Building – What is in a name? (5:13 – 8:00)
  • Preparing Kids For Life – Importance Of Establishing Relationships (8:00 – 10:10) 
  • $86,400 – Take Away $600 –  Throw Away The Rest? (10:10 –  12:00) 
  • Change Your Verbiage – ‘Have To’ Or ‘Get To’ (12:00 – 14:40) 
  • Praise Loudly, Critique Softly (14:40 – 19:51)
  • Applications of Positivity Outside Of Class (19:51 – 23:05) 
Part 2: Coaching and Teaching – Intertwined Professions
  • Best Coaches – Great Teachers (23:05 – 25:50) 
  • Winning and Losing – Be The Same Person and Coach Learning Opportunities (25:50 – 29:03) 
  • Don’t Count Down The Days – Make The Days Count (29:03 – 31:40) 
  • Check out more from the PLT4M blog and keep up the good work #InPursuitOfBetter (31:40 – 32:56)
Here’s how to make sure you never miss an episode:
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Chalk Talk – Episode 34 – Weight Room Ready – College Athletics

Chalk Talk – Episode 34 – Weight Room Ready – College Athletics

As high school coaches, we want to have done everything in our power to prepare students for what comes next. For some, what comes next is a college athletic experience.

On this episode, we blend the perspectives of both college and high school coaches. Join Greg Hadley and Sam Breslin as they discuss what to do when preparing athletes for college athletics, especially when it comes to the weight room.

Time Stamps: 
Part 1: Bridging the Gap Between High School and College Athletics
  • Evaluating Freshmen College Athletes ( 2:20-4:50)
  • Movement Mechanics Matters: (4:50-7:20)
  • Different Groups Coming to College: Who is Ready? (7:20-10:20)
  • 2 Evils: Weakness From No Training vs. Imbalances From Bad Training (10:20-14:00)
Part 2: GPP: What Does ‘Prepared’ Look Like?
  • 3 Things to Have Developed in High School: GPP, Posterior Chain and OLY LIFTS (14:00-18:20)
  • Teaching Olympic Lifts: Who Should Coach It? Who Should Avoid It? (18:20-22:10)
  • Regression vs. Starting with Position to Advance (22:10-26:03)
  • Build Trust and Keep It Simple (26:03-30:14)
  • Capacity and Conditioning (30:14-36:20)
Here’s how to make sure you never miss an episode:
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EP33

Chalk Talk – Episode 33 – Grant Writing For Physical Education feat. Jessica Shawley

Jessica Shawley

Meet Jessica Shawley

  • Shape America National Teacher of the Year
  • National Board Certified (NBCT) Physical Education Teacher
  • Masters of Education in Curriculum and Instruction from University of Idaho
  • Nationally recognized educational speaker and professional development trainer (currently serving on the Shape America Physical Education Council)
  • Check out Jessica’s full article of Grant Funding here: Full Article
‘Finding grant funding can be a crucial component to supporting a quality program, and the best news is you do not have to be a professional grant writer to find and secure these funds. – Jessica Shawley
Jessica Shawley has secured over a million dollars in grant funding for K-12 Physical Education and joins Chalk Talk to break down how anyone can become a grant writer. 

Time Stamps: 
Part 1: Grant Writing – All The Moving Parts to Consider
  • Introduction to Jessica Shawley (0:00 – 3:00)

  • Circumstances Of School Funding – ‘Grant writing is always on the tables’ (3:00 – 5:20)

  • Enhancing Your Program Know What You Want – It’s Not Just About Collecting Things (5:20 – 7:20)

  • Shape, State, and Places To Look For Grants (7:20 -12:45)

  • It Takes A Village – Work With Your Administrators and Fellow Teachers (12:45 – 15:00)

  • Grant Writing Is More Work – Set Up The System and It Gets Easier (15:00 – 21;15)

Part 2: Benefits Of Being Involved 
  • Support One Another – Family Of A Profession  (22:05 – 25:10)

  • ‘Go-Tos’ in PE For Jessica Shawley  (25:10 – 27:10)

  • What Are You Looking For In A  Conference – So Much Variety (27:10 – 29:34)

  • Specific Examples From A Conference (29:34 -30:42)

  • Paying Out Of Pocket As A Teacher – How To Handle The Costs (30:42 – 32:55)

  • Thanks To Jessica Shawley and Final Thoughts: Start A Conversation About PE! (32:55 – 34:10)

Here’s how to make sure you never miss an episode:
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Jessica Shawley

4 Things to Consider When Looking For Grant Funding

Jessica Shawley

About The Author: Jessica Shawley

  • Shape America National Teacher of the Year
  • National Board Certified (NBCT) Physical Education Teacher
  • Masters of Education in Curriculum and Instruction from University of Idaho
  • Nationally recognized educational speaker and professional development trainer (currently serving on the Shape America Physical Education Council)
  • Check out Jessica’s full conversation about grant funding on Chalk Talk 

4 Things to Consider When Looking For Grant Funding

Finding grant funding can be a crucial component to supporting a quality program, and the best news is you do not have to be a professional grant writer to find and secure these funds. With the right plan, a supportive team, a bit of organization, and lots of perseverance, many can be successful in grant writing. Though some may be turned off by the word grant writing as it can take some extra time and effort, I have found the payoff is well worth it. The more I search for and apply for funds, the more I can dial-in a process that works for me, making it easier each time I apply for a grant. Having written several physical education grants over the last 15 years, bringing in over $1 million in funding to support K-12 programming, here are four things to consider when looking for grant funding: 

1. Know what you want:

First off, what do you want? Be specific. How does it all align with and support your program’s overall mission and goals? Knowing this helps set the course for your search. Having a clear purpose in mind for funding allows you to be more efficient in finding and applying for funds. I recommend developing a comprehensive list of what you want, what is costs, and the cost of upkeep, also known as a sustainability plan. All of this helps you decide what size of grant to apply for, whether or not you need to apply for multiple smaller grants to achieve the larger outcome, or if you need to apply for different types of grants to help bring it all together. For example, you may want to find a technology grant, a curriculum-based grant, a professional development grant, and an equipment grant to fund all aspects of your wish list fully. You don’t have to settle for just one type of funding source.

2. Get Support:

Two key things come to mind here. First, does your administrator and curriculum director both know and understand your program vision and purpose? When is the last time you met with them to share the good news about what is happening in your classroom and how it supports the district’s mission? These are key players on your team that can keep an eye out for opportunities and help support you.

I also recommend seeking out those in your school who have been successful in grant writing previously and asking for support. Many colleagues are willing to help proof-read applications if you ask, which is especially helpful when you first start grant writing. Secondly, do you know your district’s grant writing approval process? Is there a required application that must be approved first before you submit your grant? How will this requirement impact your timeline? Typically, a district will want to know your grant writing plan, especially if it will be funding something that will require financial support long term. Keeping everyone in the loop will help you better develop a plan of action, including a sustainability plan once funding is exhausted, which only helps strengthen any application. 

Thinking about incorporating new technology into your classroom? Check Out PLT4M! 

3. Look Everywhere:

When looking for grant funding, I look everywhere. I leave no stone unturned. I am always on the lookout for different opportunities, and it doesn’t have to be a physical education only style of grant. My very first successful grant was a technology grant from my state’s department of education partnership with a technology company. They had never funded a P.E. program before. Why couldn’t I be the first? I had a well-developed program vision, a specific need, and a detailed plan for incorporating heart rate technology into my program. It all aligned with the grant’s purpose, so I went for it and found success. 

4. Find the right fit:

Typically, you are either looking for a more significant, all-encompassing grant or looking into several smaller awards to piece your vision altogether. Some of the different types to look for include curriculum, professional development, technology, equipment, school wellness, and nutrition. Find funding sources through professional associations, local businesses, hospital or insurance foundations, and state or federal level department of education grants. It is important to note that larger grants may have more requirements to fulfill yet are quite feasible with a plan and support team in place.

The key is finding the right fit. Knowing what you want, your district’s funding requirements, having a sustainability plan, and knowing your timeline will help you determine whether or not you are the right candidate for the funding opportunity or if the funding opportunity is the right fit for you. It goes both ways. You have to ask yourself: Do I qualify? How does my vision, and what I am seeking, align with the grant’s vision? Can I meet the reporting requirements? Are there other special requirements I must be able to fulfill?

I highly recommend grant writing as a way to support your program. Develop a list of ‘go-to’ funding sources to apply for and what the timelines are, even setting reminders on the calendar to check back in so that if you don’t receive it the first time, you can re-apply the following year. There are many opportunities available for the physical education profession at the state and national level through SHAPE America. It is essential to participate in our profession through association memberships, attending conferences when possible, and reading journals and newsletters to stay up to date on available grant opportunities. You can also utilize the many social media platforms to stay up to date and connect with others, asking them how they fund their programs. Connect with someone today and continue the conversation. Try these hashtags to start your search: #physed #funding #grantfunding #grants #SHAPEAmerica

Good luck with your grant writing journey! Check out the links below to get you started.

    • Fuel Up To Play 60 Grants (FUTP60) – A school wellness program that helps inspire student leadership and support physical activity, physical education and nutrition initiatives in your school. I have been a part of FUTP60 for over seven years, bringing in $4,000 per year to my school for our wellness initiatives, which includes physical education. 
    • Check out your state department of education, local banks, hospital foundations and health insurance network grants (example: Regence BlueShield or Blue Cross).
Mount Abraham

11 Reasons Every High School Needs A Strength and Conditioning Program

Most people who work in public education ‘wear many hats’ at their schools. When we asked Devin Wendel, a man of many hats, if he was interested in writing an article for PLT4M, his brain went racing.

Put on the ATC hat and talk about S+C and injury prevention? Put on the AD hat and talk about the weight rooms relationship to on-field success? Devin has so many hats, we won’t play out all the other ideas he could have ran with!

What we came up with instead were his 11 Benefits of S+C for the HS Level. The goal for Devin is to start a conversation, not end one. What number on the list stands out to you? What would you add to the list? Let us know!

Devin Wendel

Meet The Author: Devin Wendel

11 Reasons Every High School Needs A Strength and Conditioning Program

Ask a group of 14-18 year old student-athletes to, “Get into a good squat position,” and see what happens. Based on my past experiences as a coach, athletic trainer, and athletic director, you will likely see a few different things. 

You will have a few individuals that keep their chests up, have a nice flat back, thighs parallel to the ground – good, safe form. Another handful will likely be looking around to their peers for guidance and mimicking what the first group is doing but may need minor corrections or cues to help them establish the proper position. Meanwhile, several others are likely in some sort of awkward position, but probably not one that resembles a true and safe squat technique. The reason for this is many athletes are never taught the fundamentals of strength training and conditioning by their youth or secondary school coaches.

Through the proper implementation of strength and conditioning programs, we can better educate student-athletes on the fundamental components of body awareness and proprioception, which are crucial to athletic performance as well as injury prevention.

This scenario I just played out got me thinking…what are all the different benefits of strength and conditioning for high school students that I have seen throughout the years?

 Listed below is a small sample of benefits that I have noticed during my experiences training athletes, educating coaches, and treating athletic injuries. And because I have worn so many hats, I couldn’t keep it to the catchy Top 10 Benefits of S+C, I just had to go with 11. So here they are. Let’s go!

My 11 Benefits of S+C for the HS Level:

1. Increases athletes’ strength, speed, flexibility, agility, balance, endurance, reaction speed, and proprioception.

I thought I would start with an easy one that we can all agree on!

2.  Identifies weaknesses as well as potential risk factors that could lead to injury.

This aligns with ATC Domain # 1 – Prevention of Athletic Injury. This, in turn, allows ATC to provide more quality care spread across fewer injuries.

3. Prepares athletes for sport-specific training that will both improve their athletic performance while at the same time identifying and combating inherent risks associated with their sport.

Combine Athletic Performance and Injury Prevention – Music to my ears. And with injury prevention, you get the results right. Which leads me to number 4.

4. Keeps more players on the field, allowing for more individual and team success throughout a season.

And for teams and individuals to have success, lets not forget how important it is for everyone to be on the same page…

5. Builds communication between Strength Coach, Head Coach, Athletic Training Staff, and student-athletes.

With this communication, we can help provide education and guidance to head coaches that they can use during times when the strength coach or ATC is unavailable.

As you can see from 1-5, I cover a lot of ground. But let’s tap into a few more specifics. First and foremost, we want to be on the same page as our kids, and what better place to start than in the weight room?

Looking for ways to get everyone on the same page for their strength and conditioning? Check Out PLT4M!

6. Builds a foundation of trust between athletes and the coaching staff.

As we hear time and time again, a lot of kids do not love the weight room. They love their sports. So, put the weight room in that context. This leads me to point 7…

7. Prepares the body for reaction to a sports movement. Basic S+C translates to things like being tackled, boxing out, or jumping over a person or other obstacles on the field.

And you’ll get the kid’s attention once they hear they can dominate the low block on the court. And maybe you don’t have to tell them number 8 just yet, but I think its worth noting. Confidence is key.

8. Increases students self-confidence and improved decision making on the playing field, making athletes less timid and prone to injury. 

So these have been in the context of our high school world, but we don’t just live in that, do we? What about what is next? For athletes looking for the next level, the weight room will most certainly be a part of it.

9. Prepares athletes for the expectations that will be placed on them if they intend to play at the next level after high school.

And the next level or not, the weight room is a place for life skills. These last 2 points are where it can all wrap up. It is why we work with students in the first place. Whether we are coaches, athletic trainers, athletic directors, we can all get behind these. 

10. Teaches basic movements that can translate to a lifelong practice of exercise after their athletic careers are over. It provides an outlet for maintaining a healthy lifestyle after high school. 

11. Allows athletes to set and work towards the objective, realistic, and attainable goals that are within their control, a skill that is essential for success in life. 

While this list could go on and on, these have been the key benefits that I have noticed in my experience. I would love to hear what others tout as key benefits that strength and conditioning programs provide in relation to both injury prevention as well as life-long well-being.